Articles

The Taylor Review and the gig economy: Savvy way of working or a crafty cover up?

The Taylor Review and the gig economy: Savvy way of working or a crafty cover up?

The emergence of the gig economy has presented obstacles when attempting to determine the employment status of individuals and their consequent employment rights and tax liabilities. In the gig economy, in which companies such as Uber and Deliveroo operate, individuals are engaged on a very flexible, ad hoc basis. This relatively new model of work […]

Beers, businessmen, and a £15 million promise… a real deal?

Beers, businessmen, and a £15 million promise… a real deal?

Mike Ashley (Founder of Sports Direct) is being sued by former advisor, Jeff Blue, for a £15 million promise he made when drunk in 2013 – payable if Blue could help double Sports Direct’s share price within three years. Ashley has dismissed his claim as pub “banter” and refuses to pay. This case will necessarily […]

Uber Director resigns after sexist remark

Uber Director resigns after sexist remark

The billionaire Director of Uber has resigned after making a ‘sexist’ remark during a meeting designed to discuss the company’s culture, including the need for a more diverse work force and to address sexism in the work place. The irony failed to amuse staff members, who sent a flurry of emails to management in response, […]

Darnley v Croydon Health Services NHS Trust [2017]

Darnley v Croydon Health Services NHS Trust [2017]

Should it be fair for Courts to impose a duty of care on civilian, non-medically trained receptionists? Should the same receptionists be accountable for the provision of inaccurate information? Should a patient who was wrongly informed by the said receptionist have the right to bring a claim against a Hospital Trust? Facts of the Case […]

Dulux rejects PPG takeover offer

US paint maker PPG has abandoned plans for its ‘friendly’ takeover of Dulux owner, Dutch company AkzoNobel. This follows the rejection of several informal offers and a Dutch Court’s refusal to allow attempts by a group of shareholders to force a special shareholder meeting aimed at ousting the company’s chairman. The Court decided that the […]

Digitising police evidence set to reduce unnecessary delays to justice

Digitising police evidence set to reduce unnecessary delays to justice

Video footage from police officers’ body worn cameras will now be uploaded to the Cloud, giving solicitors quicker access to important evidence. In an increasingly digitised justice system, this new initiative may mark the end of days spent struggling to play video evidence in Court on outdated VCRs or malfunctioning DVD players. It has often […]

Joint Enterprise: floodgates slammed shut

Last year, families and pressure groups celebrated as the Supreme Court declared that the doctrine of Joint Enterprise had been incorrectly applied in Courts across England and Wales since 1985. Criminal law generally only holds offenders liable for their own actions. However, under the doctrine of Joint Enterprise, a person may be found guilty for […]

Does your company’s recruitment process involve psychometric testing?

Does your company’s recruitment process involve psychometric testing?

A job applicant with Asperger’s Syndrome has won an employment tribunal case after establishing her employer’s psychometric testing was discriminatory. Facts The Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) in the case of The Government Legal Service v Brookes established that the employer’s requirement for job candidates to sit a psychometric test was indirectly discriminatory. The Government Legal […]

The ICO bares its teeth

The ICO bares its teeth

Ahead of far-reaching changes to data protection rules that come into force next year, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has shown its willingness to take a tough stance on enforcement by imposing a record fine of £400,000 on Keurboom Communications. Keurboom breached privacy laws by making almost 100 million automated telephone calls to people without […]

Concession for Claimants? The impact of discount rate changes on Personal Injury claims

Concession for Claimants? The impact of discount rate changes on Personal Injury claims

On 27th February 2017, the Lord Chancellor issued a statement to the London Stock Exchange to announce that the discount rate for personal injury claims would be substantially cut from 2.5% to minus 0.75%. The decision was met with dismay by insurance companies and delight by litigants. Many have argued that reform is long overdue, […]